1. Bailey-Matthews Shell Museum

credit: sanibelsusan.com

One of the favorite activities of visitors to the beaches of Sanibel is shell collecting. Colorful, pretty, mysterious, small, and big, the shells make interesting souvenirs. But, why not learn a bit about them so that you can differentiate between your shells and determining whether one is a common fig shell, a banded tulip, ajunonia, or a pen shell? The best place to learn about the shells and the animals that made them is the Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum. If you are looking for unique things to see & do on your Florida getaway, this museum will delight visitors of all ages.

This fascinating museum was established 20 years ago and contains some of the largest shells in the world, such as the Goliath conch, the Atlantic trumpet triton, the lightning whelk, and the horse conch. The Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum is one of the best things to do on Sanibel Island FL for couples and families. There are exhibits of Sanibel shells and shells from all over the world and fossils of shells such as the Ecphora, which lived almost 30 million years ago. The museum is also a wonderful place to learn about the original inhabitants of Sanibel, the Calusa people. You can discover a little about their lives and the uses they had for shells in their daily lives.

2. Sanibel Historical Museum and Village

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Sanibel Historical Museum and Village, founded in 1984, tells the story of the life of early residents of Sanibel through the seven historic houses they lived and worked in. It is the story of the Calusa people, Spanish conquerors and the early pioneers who made their home on the island in the 1800s. The historic buildings were moved to the Historic Village from their original locations and restored to the original look, and they are furnished with antique furniture, clothes, household items, tools, and kitchen gadgets.Among others, there is the 1896 Sanibel School House for White Children with original desks, the 1913 Rutland House, a typical “cracker” house made of Florida pine with eleven-foot ceilings and a wide hallway to keep it cool, and the 1900 Sanibel Packing House, where local farmers brought their vegetables, citrus fruits, and other produce to be packed and shipped “up north.” The museum holds frequent special events, concerts, and lectures.

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About the Author

Rebecca is a professional blogger at SanibelIslandGo media, a writer with a passionate interest in the travel industry. Her experience, perspective, and her writing skill help to describe how beautiful is the Sanibel Island.